- (We are not responsible for the content provided by third party suppliers, sponsors and other users of this site) Source:   Wikipedia BURRY PORT & GRENDRAETH VALLEY RAILWAY Please do not take any content from this website without permission or approval. All original site content is copyrighted (2011) to Pwll Action Committee (The Bônau Cabbage Patch) unless stated otherwise. All images, text or items are copyright to their rightful owner(s). If there are any issues or concern with material on this site, please email/contact us directly to be provided credit or have the item(s) removed. We do not claim ownership to anything found on this site unless stated otherwise. The Pwll Action Committee (The Bônau Cabbage Patch) does not knowingly intend or attempt to offend or violate any copyright or intellectual property rights of any entity. No copyright infringement is intended. Please let us know if there are any mistakes in this document. We will check and alter the text where necessary. You can contact us here: pwllmag@gmail.com The Burry Port and Gwendraeth Valley Railway (BP&GVR) was a mineral railway company that constructed a railway line in Carmarthenshire, by conversion of a canal, to connect collieries and limestone pits to the sea at Kidwelly. It extended its network to include Burry Port, Trimsaran and a brickworks at Pwll, later extending to Sandy near Llanelli. For a time the company worked the separate Gwendraeth Valleys Railway. The BP&GVR was notable because of the very low height of some overbridges, a legacy of the canal conversion. It was completely dependent on the economy of the mineral industries  it served and due to depression in them, it was for many years in administration. In the final years of the nineteenth century those industries   developed considerably and the fortunes of the BP&GVR improved as well, paying 10% dividends for several years, before absorption by the Great   Western Railway in 1922.   For some time the line carried miners to their place of work, and their  families   to  market, and from 1913 the Company carried the general  public in  passenger trains.  After 1945 mineral extraction in the area declined steeply; passenger    operation ceased in 1953, and in the 1960s most of the network closed progressively as pits closed. The final short section at Kidwelly closed in 1998.